10 Ukrainian Words I Learned in Kiev

 

McDonald’s-ua
Yes, people speak Ukrainian and Russian in Kiev. But advertisements and television programs tend to be in Ukrainian, the official language. Russian and Ukrainian are approximately 60% similar. So, knowing one does help with comprehending the other. However, there are many things that make each language unique. Ukrainian has one more case and an additional imperfective future verb tense. Hooray for declination and conjugation in Slavic languages xD Below you will learn some differences in vocabulary that I picked up in Kiev while I attended Russian lessons for seven weeks.

 

Ukrainian – Russian – English

  1. так (tak) – да (da) – yes 

  2. привіт (pryvit) – привет (privet) – hi

  3. доброго ранку (dobrovo rankoo) – доброе утро (dobroye ootra) – good morning 

  4. доброго дня (dobrovo dnya) – добрый день (dobryy den’) – good afternoon

  5. дякую (dyakooyu) – спасибо (spasiba) – thanks

  6. будь ласка (bud’ laska)– пожалуйста (pozhaloosta) – please/you’re welcome

  7. великий (velykyy) – большой (bol’shoy)- big (false friend: великий means great in Russian)

  8. це (tse) – это (ehto) – this/it

  9. кава (kava) – кофе (kofe) – coffee 

  10. горілка (xhorilka) – водка (vodka)- vodka (Ukrainian “г” has a different sound: “xh” not “g”)

 

Comparison of Ukrainian and Russian alphabets:

ukrainian alphabet

RussianAlphabet

 

Did you know about these Ukrainian words? I’d love to hear from you!
One more thing before I conclude this post: Yes, I am interested in Ukrainian! This year I have also decided to learn some Ukrainian. I won’t be learning the grammar formally like I have done with German, Russian and French, but I do want to learn some basic words and phrases. The language is personally interesting to me since I lived in Kiev and got to know Ukrainian people and culture. Plus, it’s fun to compare the similarities with Russian. I really like Ukrainian so far ❤ Since I don’t plan on studying or working in Ukraine, I don’t see any need learning the language past a B1 level. At most, I’ll probably reach A2. I’ve got a phrase book and two vocabulary books. And I use Duolingo and YouTube. As I go on, I may use other websites and language learning apps. Even though A2 isn’t that high of a level, I look forward to using some Ukrainian the next time I visit Ukraine!
Чудового дня! / Have a lovely day!
❤ Stephanie

New Discovery in Kiev

I got to see a new part of Kiev today! A permanent flea market with an open-air book market. It was wonderful to dive into the stacks of books.. to test my knowledge of reading Russian and to discover some books in English, German and French. My buddy also found a book he had been searching for!! Schwein gehabt 🙂

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Despite the cold, rainy and grey weather, I had a great time. I feel like most big cities have these layers. As short-time tourists, we stay on a level of tourism.. only seeing attractions but not getting to know the city as it lives naturally. Ordinary parts of a city aren’t so ordinary when you find something you like. Like going to a book market as a book lover. I enjoyed myself and am glad that I keep finding new things to do and see.

For those interested, the book market along with the other flea markets there are directly at the station Pochaina (formerly Petrivka) on the blue line of the metro. In my post about Kiev, I mentioned a collection of shops at an underground crossing near Arsenalna station that sell a decent variety of new books, but this area is a typical flea market with a huge collection of used books especially in Russian language. Likealocalguide.com says that it’s the biggest book market in Ukraine with books of all genres and an authentic atmosphere. And I agree! It’s an authentic place with so much history and so many beautiful stories waiting to be discovered –> Petrivka Market

Best Wishes

~ Stephanie F.